LAVOISIER'S FRIENDS

Lavoisier (17 ko)
Lavoisier's portrait by Mademoiselle Brossard-Beaulieu
(private collection)

 

Lavoisier in french
FRANCAIS

Summary
 
Lavoisier considered that it was in founding the new chemistry that he gave his measure and history has largely ratified his self-estimate, according him the leading role that Isaac Newton played in physics, Charles Darwin in evolutionary biology, Albert Einstein in relativity, and Niels Bohr in quantum mechanics.
 
All were prime movers in transformations of a scope that, as if anticipating political events, Lavoisier called a revolution in his science. This revolution includes the replacement of phlogiston by oxygen in the theory of combustion, the adoption of the systematic nomenclature in use ever since, the dependence on the principle of conservation of matter, the rigorously quantitative mode of analysis. Due weight must be given to the importance of his study of respiration both for physiology and for the early history of organic chemistry.
 
But science is always a collective enterprise, and the parts of others, of predecessors, associates, and opponents, must be explained; here we have the whole cast, French, British, and European, and not merely the protagonist, the ultimately tragic protagonist. Putting matters in perspective does not entail any belittling of Lavoisier's stature nor any subordination of the content of his science to the social and political context. Still, the overall story of the chemical revolution is familiar, and it is mainly in the account of Lavoisier's fu rther concerns that new ground can be explored. Beyond the mere facts of his having been a partner in the Tax Farm, an administrator of the Gunpowder Service, and a model farmer, little has been known of how Lavoisier actually spent his days. As a rule, chemistry occupied only the hours before breakfast and in the evenings. For the rest, his life was that of a financier, economist, and liberal administrator, a "grand commis d'état."(See Jean-Pierre Poirier. Lavoisier Chemist, Biologist, Economist, Philadelphia: Pennsylvania University Press, 1996).
 
Jean-Pierre Poirier
Comité Lavoisier
Académie des Sciences de Paris
 

CONTENTS

 

I) LAVOISIER (1743-1794)

II)
WEBSITES ON LAVOISIER

III)
OUR GOALS

IV)
INFORMATIONS

I LAVOISIER (1743-1794)

 

 

rondbleuLife and works of Antoine-Laurent de Lavoisier

Summary

Chapter 1: LAVOISIER, A TASTE FOR SCIENCE

Chapter 2: LAVOISIER, CHEMIST

Chapter 3: LAVOISIER, PIONEER IN PUBLIC HEALTH

Chapter 4: LAVOISIER, PHYSIOLOGIST

Chapter 5 : LAVOISIER, BIOLOGIST

Chapter 6: LAVOISIER, ECONOMIST

Chapter 7: LAVOISIER, SENIOR CIVIL SERVANT

Chapter 8: LAVOISIER, ARTS AND TRADES

Chapter 9 : "LA REPUBLIQUE N'A PAS BESOIN DE SAVANTS"

 

rondbleuBibliography

rondbleuLavoisier papers

rondbleuLavopisize mage Gallery

rondbleuLavoisier Books Reviews

 

BACK

 

II WEBSITES ON LAVOISIER

 

  • Lavoisier's manuscripts at the Archives de l'Académie des Sciences
    http://www.academie-sciences.fr

  • PANOPTICON LAVOISIER aims at creating a virtual museum of the collections of the French chemist Antoine Laurent Lavoisier (1743-1794) scattered throughout the world. A detailed chronology of Lavoisier's life and works, the catalogue of Lavoisier's manuscripts (ca. 6000 items), laboratory apparatus (ca. 500 items), library (ca. 3000 items) and minerals (ca. 4000 items), the digital edition of Lavoisier's collected works, the bibliography on and of the French chemist (ca. 2000 bibliographic records) as well as his complete iconography are integrated in one relational database, Pinakes , and made available to remote users.
    http://193.206.220.40/lavoisier

  • The Conservatoire National des Arts et  Métiers (CNAM) exhibits the splendid collection of Lavoisier's laboratory instruments.
    http://www.cnam.fr/

  • Paris News: 8 May 1794. An exclusive interview, granted by Marie-Anne Pierrette Paulze (Madame Lavoisier) several months before her husband's death, to our Woodrow Wilson Institute News (WWIN) correspondent http://www.woodrow.org/teachers/ci/1992/Lavoisier.html

  • A French chemist and the father of modern chemistr
    http://www.dupont.com/corp/r-and-d/lavoisier/antoine.htm

  • Cavendsish:
    http://www.treasure-troves.com/bios/Cavendish.htm

  • UCSD Websites University of California and San Diego
    http://www.ucsd.edu/alpha/index.html

  • The Chemical Heritage Foundation (CHF) takes appropriate steps to make known the achievements of chemical and molecular scientists and engineers and of related sciences, technologies, and industries.http://www.chemheritage.org/

III OUR GOALS

  • To make known the work of Antoine-Laurent de Lavoisier (1743-1794), the founder of modern chemistry.

  • To circulate information regarding contemporary research on the life and work of Lavoisier.

  • To assemble a complete bibliography on Lavoisier.

  • To find and make known Lavoisier's papers.

  • To create a Lavoisier Forum.

  • To provide support for the Comité Lavoisier of the Académie des Sciences, which is responsible for editing Lavoisier's correspondence, 23, Quai Conti, 7-75006 Paris, FRANCE - Tel. (33) 1 44 41 43 85; mail to <archives@academie-sciences.fr>.

     

 

IV INFORMATIONS

THE FIRST BIOGRAPHY OF MADAME LAVOISIER
 
Last October, Jean-Pierre Poirier has published the first biography of Madame Lavoisier (1758-1836). Born Marie Anne Paulze, the daughter of a farmer general, she married Lavoisier when she was 13 years old. She never had any child but, during 22 years, was secretary and assistant to her husband. Talented for public relations, she helped him in the triumph all over Europe of the chemical revolution. Pierre Samuel Du Pont de Nemours, her lover, gave here a taste for political and economic ideas. Imprisoned during the terror, she escaped guillotine.
In 1805, she married count Rumford but could not achieve with him the same sort of happy couple that she previously had with Lavoisier.
The aim of this book is to give an accurate evaluation of Madame Lavoisier's talents as chemist and to define her real contribution to the chemical revolution.
 
Jean-Pierre Poirier, Science et l'Amour. Madame Lavoisier, Paris, Éditions Pygmalion, 2004. 31 euros..
 
 
 
LECOQ MUSEUM

The Lecoq Museum in Clermont-Ferrand exhibits the Lavoisier collection of mineralogy with 3500 items including rocks, fossils, botanical and animal samples in 932 glass bottles. This collection is described in professeur Deluzarche's article in l'Actualité chimique, janvier-février 1987, p 7 à 11 For more informatiuon, contact Pierre Pénicaud, Directeur du Musée Lecoq: E-laill zecoq@nat.fr
Mineral collection
The Muséum d'histoire naturelle Henri-Lecoq of Clermont Ferrand (Puy-de-Dôme, France) preserves Lavoisier's collection of minerals. It was donated to the city in 1837 by Léon de Chazelles and his wife Jean de Sugny, niece and heir of Madame Lavoisier. The catalogue of the collection, under the direction of Stephane Pelucchi, will be completed in 2004 and it has been realised by using a database SN-BBASE. The migration of the data into Panopticon follows with ca. a year of delay.
 
The Museum also preserves three manuscripts describing the collection: one by Lavoisier (not complete), and two made during 1856-57 and 1881 after the donation.
 
The collection consists of specimens partly preserved in glass blown recipients. The recipients are 993 have been inventoried without any other specific information than their size. They do not only contain minerals and fossils (which are 909) but also vegetable specimens (73), animal specimens (5) and archaeological items (5)..
Foor more informations see Pierre Pénicaud, Director of Lecoq Museum in, Clermont-Ferrand, (Puy-de-Dôme, France) , e-mail : museum.lecoq@nat.fr
 
 
 
This website has been written by Jean Pierre Poirier author of ≥Lavoisier, Chemist, Biologist, Economist, Philadelphia : University of Pennsylvania Press, 1996,≤ and designed by Martin Comar.

CONTENTS

:jp.poirier@bigfoot.com

 

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Updated : November 2004